Sunday, December 14, 2014

Christmas Aprons, Tablecloths, Etc.

I keep all my holiday textiles folded in a drawer and take them out when I get in the "holiday spirit." This year I took photos :)


I own a few Christmas aprons from the 1960s & 1970s. 



A full apron with green and white stripes and a large "Santa's Helper" pocket. 



A half apron made of a poly/cotton blend fabric with silver cord trim at the pocket and along the lower edge. 



A fancy red nylon net apron with grosgrain ribbon waistband and ties, silver rick-rack, and a sequin-decorated felt Christmas tree. 


These bloomers/pantaloons were made from two dishcloths and finished with red crochet trim and green satin bows.


An early Arts & Crafts-style embroidered pillow cover with fringe c. 1900.



A large holiday tablecloth with poinsettias, candles, and holly.



A small red tablecloth with winter scenes in white and colorful holly and poinsettias in the corners. 

I'll post pics of my Christmas quilts soon.

I still have lots of shopping to do, how about you? 




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Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer




Monday, December 8, 2014

Annual Christmas Tea

Yesterday the Livingston Historical Society hosted their annual Christmas Tea at the Force Homestead and Museum. There were lots of homemade goodies, hot mulled cider, lovely holiday decorations, and  quilts and vintage dresses displayed throughout :)


The tree in the entrance hallway was decorated with old-fashioned candle lights and strings of popcorn and cranberries.


A festive assortment of fresh greens, holly, and lemons on the mantelpiece , , , 


. . . and wreaths on the bannister. 


A crazy quilt in one of the upstairs bedrooms.


Log Cabin and One Patch silk quilts on this cradle.


Another Log Cabin on this one. 


A lovely 8-Pointed Star with chintz setting squares was folded on a chair.


 There was a Nine-Patch in a glass case in the museum room. 


 My favorite dress and apron in the "blue" bedroom.

 

The museum room houses a wonderful collection of wedding gowns dating from 1790 to 1940.


A detail of the 1907 gown.


We had a popcorn stringing get-together Tuesday morning :)



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Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer



Monday, December 1, 2014

Flags of the American Revolution Update

November was the month to make the Whiskey Rebellion flag and three Sawtooth Stars. Hop on over to Lori's Humble Quilts blog to see what others are doing.


Lots of applique on this flag. Rather than having the streamers start at the tip of the beak I moved them down a bit because they were really, really narrow at this point and I wanted to make sure there was enough room to turn the fabric under. After appliqueing the first two stars I figured out a good method for the remaining eleven.


I made a sample block and realized I needed a fabric for the side triangles that was more or less the same value as the main color so off to the quilt shop I went :) The finished block size is 10".


Oops! I got carried away and made all 5 stars so I'm 2 ahead of the game :)

Here is a link to Jan Patek's site so you can see what the finished quilt will look like.   


__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer


Monday, November 24, 2014

One of Each

Another short post for a short week :)


One of my early quilts (1977) inspired by a c. 1870 quilt in McCall's Needlework Bicentennial Quilt Book (1975). There are 2,304 1-1/2" squares all hand-pieced and hand-quilted. I followed the suggested color key and constructed the quilt in diagonal rows to the half-way point and then repeated the process starting from the opposite corner. From a distance it looks like the fabrics could be reproductions but . . . .



 . . . they are actually ones I purchased when I was in high school--yikes! When I started making this quilt the fabrics were already 15 years old. If I didn't have enough of a certain color I would purchase 1/4 yard pieces for about 50-cents each.


I quilted a cable in the border and cross-hatch in the squares. This quilt is still one of my all-time favorites.

 Haselton Cemetery, Wilmington, Essex, NY
 
We'll be in the Adirondacks for Thanksgiving so I thought you'd like to see another example of what I call an "Adirondack-style" gravestone. So far, this is the only area where I've seen gravestones with outdoor scenes in color. The names are inscribed on the base.

 Preston
Robert L. Sr.
Apr. 3, 1927 - June 14, 1984
Married
Oct. 23, 1954
Pauline Jaques
Feb. 11, 1935 - Sept. 26, 1998


My maternal great-grandfather Heinrich Wilhelm Strubbe (1853-1917) and his grandson, William H. Strubbe (1911-1924). Taken in the Bronx.


A visitor in our yard this spring.

Wishing you a wonderful Thanksgiving :)



__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer





Monday, November 17, 2014

Remember Arpilleras?

Do you remember those three dimensional applique fabric pictures that were made in South America during the 1980s? They were sold at our local mall when the antiques show was in town. I had nearly forgotten that I owned several until I found them in one of my textile drawers when I was cleaning out this fall.

These pieces are delightful with their brightly-colored fabrics, stuffed fruits and figures, animals, and heavily embroidered plants and flowers. The ones made in Peru mostly depict pastoral scenes.


Peru is the land of the sun and mountain air. This piece is 19-1/2" x 20-1/2" with a crocheted orange yarn border.


The figures are usually shown in traditional activities like this man wearing a peach-colored shirt and shiny blue pants picking fruit off the tree. The fabrics throughout are varied and look similar to our cotton, wool, terrycloth, and flannel.


Note the heavily embroidered corn stalks and flowers. The sheep are woolly and soft. The background fabrics overlap and the raw edges are blanket-stitched.   


A stamp on the back indicates this piece was "Hand-made in Peru". The backing is burlap thus the name "arpillera."


Unlike the three-dimensional appliques in the large arpillera above, the ones in this picture are more traditional with edges turned under.    


Simple embroidery.   


Note the tufts of grass and the cactus spines.


 The embroidery goes right through to the back.


Another small piece with houses, girls, birds, trees--and the sun but no mountains. 


Love the two-leaf tree on the left . . .


. . . and the colorful one on the right :)




__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer




Monday, November 10, 2014

The Ultimate Sacrifice

This Veteran's Day let us not forget those who made the ultimate sacrifice. One of those young men was my husband's uncle, Joseph William Franklin (1920-1945).
 

Joe was the son of Kasmar and Johanna (Hudson) Franckevitch of Seattle, WA. He had four sisters--Johanna, Liz, Frances, and Mary; and three brothers who also served in the military--Kas, Pete, and Jim.


This photo was taken in 1942.


2nd Lieut. Joseph William Franklin. Seattle Daily Times, May 3, 1943.


Joe's plane was shot down on a bombing mission northwest of Kobe, Japan. His B-29 aircraft was flying in the No. 2 position as deputy leader in the 52d Bombardment Squadron, 29th Bomb Group. According to an eyewitness account in the Missing Air Group Report that I found on Fold3.com, "The airplane commander probably put the airplane in a dive in an attempt to put out the flames . . . approximately 12,000 feet, the wing was torn off. . . " 

There were 11 crew members on board: 1st Lt. Joseph W. Franklin (WA), 2nd Lt. Paul H. Stuart (AL), 2nd Lt. Ralph J. Massaro (CA), 2nd Lt. Stephen F. Wenczel (NJ), F/O Frank A. Urso (IL), S/Sgt John R. Vincent (TX), S/Sgt Bryan McKown, Jr. (OH) S/Sgt George C. Peare (NJ), S/Sgt Henry F. Pleasants, Jr. (NC), Sgt. Robert I. Ellis (PA), and Sgt. Lavone L. Nix (SC).

Joe was honored with the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, and Purple Heart. 

At the time of his death, he was married and had a 2-year old daughter; a son was born two weeks later. Joe's final resting place is in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, HI.

JOSEPH W. FRANKLIN
WASHINGTON
 CAPTAIN 29 AAF BOMB GROUP
WORLD WAR II
MAY 5 1920  JUNE 5 1945

- - - - - - - - - - -

I organize all the veterans' gravestones that I photograph and upload to FindAGrave.com by creating "virtual cemeteries" for each conflict. The following men were either reported missing or killed in action during World War II.

 Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

BAIRD
1884 CORA M.. 1927
1884 DAVID L. 1965
1913 DAVID H. 1944
MISSING IN ACTION U.S.N. W.W. II

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

STILWELL
CPL. JOHN V. STILWELL, U.S.M.C.
KILLED IN ACTION SEPT. 23, 1944
AGE 23
PELELIU ISLAND, PALAU

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

LT. ROBERT HULBERT JR.
868 BOMBING SQUADRON
13TH AIR FORCE
MISSING IN ACTION JUNE 20, 1945
AGE 21

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

RICKEY
ROBERT D RICKEY A.M.M. 3/C
BORN MAY 10, 1918
DIED MAY 10, 1943
IN THE SERVICE OF HIS COUNTRY 
AT ADAK, ALASKA

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

IN MEMORY OF OUR BELOVED SON
WERNER J. HOLLY
PRIVATE U.S. ARMY
1922  1944
KILLED IN ACTION IN THE SERVICE OF HIS COUNTRY
BURIED IN LUXEMBURG

First Presbyterian Church of Hanover, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

FREDERICK WALTER HOPPING
KILLED IN ACTION IN FRANCE
CORPORAL 1ST BN. 116TH INF. 29TH DIV.
FEB. 8, 1907  JUNE 6, 1944

   Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, Albany, NY

IN LOVING MEMORY OF PFC. WILLIAM JOHN WALKER, JR.
BORN APRIL 18, 1925 KILLED IN ACTION MARCH 18, 1945
BURIED IN AMERICAN CEMETERY AT HAMM. LUXEMBOURG

 

LET US NOT FORGET



__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer