Monday, November 17, 2014

Remember Arpilleras?

Do you remember those three dimensional applique fabric pictures that were made in South America during the 1980s? They were sold at our local mall when the antiques show was in town. I had nearly forgotten that I owned several until I found them in one of my textile drawers when I was cleaning out this fall.

These pieces are delightful with their brightly-colored fabrics, stuffed fruits and figures, animals, and heavily embroidered plants and flowers. The ones made in Peru mostly depict pastoral scenes.


Peru is the land of the sun and mountain air. This piece is 19-1/2" x 20-1/2" with a crocheted orange yarn border.


The figures are usually shown in traditional activities like this man wearing a peach-colored shirt and shiny blue pants picking fruit off the tree. The fabrics throughout are varied and look similar to our cotton, wool, terrycloth, and flannel.


Note the heavily embroidered corn stalks and flowers. The sheep are woolly and soft. The background fabrics overlap and the raw edges are blanket-stitched.   


A stamp on the back indicates this piece was "Hand-made in Peru". The backing is burlap thus the name "arpillera."


Unlike the three-dimensional appliques in the large arpillera above, the ones in this picture are more traditional with edges turned under.    


Simple embroidery.   


Note the tufts of grass and the cactus spines.


 The embroidery goes right through to the back.


Another small piece with houses, girls, birds, trees--and the sun but no mountains. 


Love the two-leaf tree on the left . . .


. . . and the colorful one on the right :)




__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer




Monday, November 10, 2014

The Ultimate Sacrifice

This Veteran's Day let us not forget those who made the ultimate sacrifice. One of those young men was my husband's uncle, Joseph William Franklin (1920-1945).
 

Joe was the son of Kasmar and Johanna (Hudson) Franckevitch of Seattle, WA. He had four sisters--Johanna, Liz, Frances, and Mary; and three brothers who also served in the military--Kas, Pete, and Jim.


This photo was taken in 1942.


2nd Lieut. Joseph William Franklin. Seattle Daily Times, May 3, 1943.


Joe's plane was shot down on a bombing mission northwest of Kobe, Japan. His B-29 aircraft was flying in the No. 2 position as deputy leader in the 52d Bombardment Squadron, 29th Bomb Group. According to an eyewitness account in the Missing Air Group Report that I found on Fold3.com, "The airplane commander probably put the airplane in a dive in an attempt to put out the flames . . . approximately 12,000 feet, the wing was torn off. . . " 

There were 11 crew members on board: 1st Lt. Joseph W. Franklin (WA), 2nd Lt. Paul H. Stuart (AL), 2nd Lt. Ralph J. Massaro (CA), 2nd Lt. Stephen F. Wenczel (NJ), F/O Frank A. Urso (IL), S/Sgt John R. Vincent (TX), S/Sgt Bryan McKown, Jr. (OH) S/Sgt George C. Peare (NJ), S/Sgt Henry F. Pleasants, Jr. (NC), Sgt. Robert I. Ellis (PA), and Sgt. Lavone L. Nix (SC).

Joe was honored with the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, and Purple Heart. 

At the time of his death, he was married and had a 2-year old daughter; a son was born two weeks later. Joe's final resting place is in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, HI.

JOSEPH W. FRANKLIN
WASHINGTON
 CAPTAIN 29 AAF BOMB GROUP
WORLD WAR II
MAY 5 1920  JUNE 5 1945

- - - - - - - - - - -

I organize all the veterans' gravestones that I photograph and upload to FindAGrave.com by creating "virtual cemeteries" for each conflict. The following men were either reported missing or killed in action during World War II.

 Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

BAIRD
1884 CORA M.. 1927
1884 DAVID L. 1965
1913 DAVID H. 1944
MISSING IN ACTION U.S.N. W.W. II

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

STILWELL
CPL. JOHN V. STILWELL, U.S.M.C.
KILLED IN ACTION SEPT. 23, 1944
AGE 23
PELELIU ISLAND, PALAU

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

LT. ROBERT HULBERT JR.
868 BOMBING SQUADRON
13TH AIR FORCE
MISSING IN ACTION JUNE 20, 1945
AGE 21

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

RICKEY
ROBERT D RICKEY A.M.M. 3/C
BORN MAY 10, 1918
DIED MAY 10, 1943
IN THE SERVICE OF HIS COUNTRY 
AT ADAK, ALASKA

Hanover Cemetery, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

IN MEMORY OF OUR BELOVED SON
WERNER J. HOLLY
PRIVATE U.S. ARMY
1922  1944
KILLED IN ACTION IN THE SERVICE OF HIS COUNTRY
BURIED IN LUXEMBURG

First Presbyterian Church of Hanover, E. Hanover, Morris, NJ

FREDERICK WALTER HOPPING
KILLED IN ACTION IN FRANCE
CORPORAL 1ST BN. 116TH INF. 29TH DIV.
FEB. 8, 1907  JUNE 6, 1944

   Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, Albany, NY

IN LOVING MEMORY OF PFC. WILLIAM JOHN WALKER, JR.
BORN APRIL 18, 1925 KILLED IN ACTION MARCH 18, 1945
BURIED IN AMERICAN CEMETERY AT HAMM. LUXEMBOURG

 

LET US NOT FORGET



__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer





Thursday, November 6, 2014

Into Browns and Blues

The fabrics in my most recent quilts are mainly browns and blues. 


I finished this top yesterday. When I saw this quilt on Lori's Humble Quilts blog, I knew I had to make one like it. Originally I thought I would try and reproduce the quilt and make it bed-size but that thought didn't last very long, lol! This is 55" square. 


I pulled all the fabrics from my stash that I thought could work.


As it turns out I only used 5 of them. The sashing is a Kaye England fabric that I purchased years ago. I had 3+ yards which worked out well as I fussy cut the long strips so the flowers would match up. The blocks are 9" and the sashing 4".  


I'm in the process of quilting this one now but it all began with two early quilts and the blue fabric . . .


In 2003 Rachel, Rita and I went to see the Art of the Needle quilt exhibit at the Shelburne Museum. I loved this quilt the moment I saw it.


Then in 2006 we were at the AQSG Seminar in CT. Another favorite!


At some point I bought a yard of this fabric Treasures of the York County Heritage Trust by Roberta Benvin and Joan Hamme for P&B Textiles. 

 

I'm quilting the blocks in double lines throughout like those in the Shelburne quilt above but haven't yet decided what to do in the borders. It's 27" x 27".


I had a lot of 3" swatches that I cut in fourths to make these little 4-patches. An inner-and-outer border of blue and brown was the perfect setting :)




__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer





Friday, October 31, 2014

Flags of the American Revolution Update

Here are my flags for the Flags of the American Revolution quiltalong. You can see what other quilters are doing on Lori's Humble Quilts blog. What fun to see everyone's blocks! 


Instead of embroidering the snake's tongue and eye, I inked them in using a Pigma pen.


I knew I didn't want to use star buttons for the next few flags as was suggested. Even bought a package of stick-on felt stars at Michaels but they were too big . . . 


Then I remembered I had these star fabrics. They were perfect. I cut out the blue stars and fused them to the flag below and then did the same with the smaller stars (using the reverse side as they were a bit "whiter") and fused them to the next two.


Oops, one star shifted a bit. Can you tell which one?




I'm all prepared to start November's assignment. Have my fabrics and just traced the pieces for the eagle applique onto freezer paper.

Happy Sewing!



__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer




Tuesday, October 28, 2014

One of Each

A quilt, a gravestone, and a family photo with Halloween in mind.


Take a closer look. Certainly not fall colors, not even a Halloween theme . . .


Did you notice The Jersey Devil?


Looks like this little boy loved bats and things that go bump in the night.  


My great-grand aunt, Maud McCord Schmitt (left), her husband, Charles, and a friend going to a "fancy dress party" in 1906. Great costumes, don't you think?


HAPPY HALLOWEEN!



__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara  Schaffer



Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A Graveyard Tour & Some Interesting Motifs

Last Saturday friends and I FINALLY went on the graveyard tour of the First Presbyterian Churchyard in Morristown, NJ. Every time we talked about going there was a major climatic event to deal with like Superstorm Sandy or a freak October snowstorm but this year the weather was on our side and we weren't disappointed.


The cemetery is tucked behind the First Presbyterian Church "On the Green" in downtown Morristown. 


A map of the cemetery and the names of everyone interred are on the church's website here. I'm always on the lookout for gravestones with interesting motifs so here are a few that I found and photographed.


The oldest stone in the cemetery is that of Mrs. Abigail Goble who died in 1742 at the age of 62 years. Her gravestone features a Felled Tree With Ax where the hand of God extends from a cloud in the upper right hand corner. "Memento Mori" or Remember Death is inscribed along the top curve. 


"Here lies inter'd ye body of ye widow Elizabeth Lindsley. . . "   

 

Oops! The carver ran out of space for the last two letters of ElizabeTH so he added them above the 'e.'



Lovely flourishes or curlicues and a leafy vine adorn the gravestone of Harriet and Theodore Briant who died in 1833 and 1824.  



"Here lies Interr'd the body of Prudence Wife of Joseph King Who departed this life Feb. 2, 1746 aged 25 years. . . " This pear-faced soul effigy with crown and wings was most likely the work of Uzal Ward a carver from Elizabethtown, NJ. 



One of the most popular motifs in the 17th & 18th centuries was the Death's Head or Winged Skull as seen on Hannah Lyon's gravestone in 1763. 

 

Welcome to Heaven.

 
Rising Sun or renewed life on the gravestone of Elizabeth Stiles 1792. 

 

At the end of the tour we went back through the church to take another look at the beautiful Tiffany windows. 


This one depicts George Washington receiving Communion in the church orchard in the Spring of 1777.

Cemetery Project Updates :)

Yay! I've reached over 10,000 memorials on Find A Grave and am still working on the Woodlawn Cemetery Project along with other volunteers. To date we've entered over 80,000 names with a goal of 250,000.

Happy Wednesday!
 

__________
Copyright 2014, Barbara Schaffer