Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Antebellum 9, Johan Strubbe, DD Blocks

Oh what fun! Antebellum #9 Lexington Belle is done :) 


I made this block in memory of my maternal 2nd gr-grandfather, Johan Heinrich Friedrich Strubbe, who was b. June 28, 1819 in Harpenfeld, Germany. 


I found this wonderful bird inking on Pinterest . . .


. . . and used it for the center of this block.


About 8 years ago when I was researching my Strubbe ancestors, I had a pleasant surprise when I found a Post 'Em Note on my Another Davis Family Tree on RootsWeb. It was from Anke Waldeman in Germany. She and some other researchers were tracking families who had emigrated from Harpenfeld to the U.S. and provided me with names and dates of my 2nd gr-grandfather's siblings and parents. Johan never came to the U.S. but some of his children did including my gr-grandfather Heinrich Wilhelm aka William Henry Strubbe.


My journey led me to the graves of relatives who were buried in a cemetery only 5 minutes from our house. Who knew?? And I met a 3rd cousin who was a descendant of Eleanor Strubbe, my gr-grandfather's sister. When I was done (though never really done, lol!) I gave my brother a binder with all the info I had gathered. 

On another note I continue to make Dear Daughter blocks (Sentimental Stitches) and try to focus on those that were originally made in NJ. 


Oops! Not NJ but I liked the pattern :)


Originally made by Ann F. Randolph, New Market, NJ and "Peased" in Wisconsin Fulton Co. 1850.


And this was originally made by Elizabeth Dunham, Piscataway, NJ 1852. I'm still enjoying these small appliques. The blocks are 8". 

Lastly . . . 


Our guild's October BOM was called Birch Block. It was super simple to make. Three striped strips on a bright solid color background. I turned it in at Monday night's meeting but didn't win the raffle. Some lucky person got all 37!

Have a great week!

P.S. Is anyone else not receiving emails when comments are posted? I noticed it yesterday. 




Copyright 2018, Barbara Schaffer


13 comments:

  1. What lovely inking! How fun to do heritage digging. I was involved in that for quite some time but it is time consuming.
    The birch block is so cool! I love seeing a stand of birch in the forest of evergreens.

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    1. Thanks, Lori! Genealogy is definitely time consuming and addictive! I enjoyed making that birch block. So easy!

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  2. Another lovely pieced block with beautiful inking! Your chocolatey brown fabric is perfect too. The dedication to seeking out ancestral links sure gave you some wonderful rewards.

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    1. Thank you, Pat! I've really enjoyed researching my ancestral roots.

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  3. I love the inking you replicated.
    How incredible that those ancestors were buried so near! I love discoveries like that!
    Beautiful work on the applique blocks.

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    1. I was so surprised to discover my relatives' gravestones in a local cemetery. Absolutely crazy!

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  4. What an amazing find with the relatives and buried so close. Your binding is a work of art in itself.
    Your bird ink is precious. You did the original proud! (better)
    the BOM is fun. I still miss GSQ. Such great memories of my times there with Jill and Mary V.
    Your Red and Green blocks looks great, no matter which state they are from :)

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    1. Thanks, Barb, for all your sweet comments!

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  5. Including your relatives names in your quilt will definitely make it a family treasure. You're getting really good at the inking! I dabble in genealogy as well. When I was back in Michigan lately, I visited a few small cemeteries and found many family members. I hope they know they're not forgotten. Love your sweet appliques.

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    1. It seems I'm the only one in the family who enjoys doing genealogy. My first passion is quilting, of course!

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  6. That is a beautiful Lexington block, especially with the nice inking. Micron pigma pen? I'm going to copy your idea! Finding out about family history isn't easy... census records to not tell much, so much is lost. My paternal grandfather was #5 of 13 kids, so Daddy had a huge amount of cousins! Most we never knew. However there is an extended family reunion that happens every couple years that I've gone to and met distant cousins. Perhaps you might find that your family has that sort of thing? Daddy and his cousins are gone now, but i'm now in touch with some of their kids and grandkids.

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    1. Thank you! Yes, I used a 03 Pigma Pen for the inking. I went to a few Davis gatherings in Sullivan County, NY, after discovering I was related to someone I knew through work!

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